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Redbud CNPS Past Events

These are some of the events that have been hosted by Redbud. They show the kinds of programs Redbud has presented in the past and wants to continue make available in the future to members and non-members alike.
 

 
 
 
California's Native Garden Gems
Native Perennials, Shrubs, and Vines for Sierra Foothill Gardens
 
Guest Speaker: Nancy Gilbert
 
 
 
Friday, Setember 21st
7:00 to 9:00 p.m.
 
Madelyn Helling Library
980 Helling Way, Nevada City, CA 95959
 
Learn about California’s finest garden-worthy native plants for our region. Nancy Gilbert, horticulture chair of the Redbud Chapter of the California Native Plant Society, will introduce you to over 85 adaptable, beautiful and low-maintenance native plants. This covers native perennials, shrubs, and vines that thrive in our Sierra foothill gardens. Her presentation includes photos and detailed descriptions of their features and characteristics, cultural and maintenance requirements. She will also discuss their myriad landscape uses.
 
Nancy has an M.S. degree in Science Education and is a naturalist, environmental educator, landscape designer and avid amateur photographer. She and her husband have owned and operated Far West Bulb Farm for over 25 years.

  
 


 
Monarchs and Milkweed
Guest Speakers: Bonnie Bradt and Kate Brennan
 
 
 
 
Wednesday, August 29th
7:00 to 9:00 p.m.
 
Madelyn Helling Library
980 Helling Way, Nevada City, CA 95959
 
 
One of the special treasures of life in Nevada and Placer Counties is that Monarch butterflies are native here. Learn how to raise Monarchs, and the milkweed plants on which they depend, during this special Redbud presentation.
 
Bonnie Bradt and Kate Brennan, both members of the Nevada County Master Gardener team of “Monarch Wranglers,” will share information about planting and growing native milkweed and other pollinator plants to attract Monarch butterflies. They’ll relate their personal experiences rearing Monarch butterflies and provide information on best practices for doing so at home.
 
 
Bonnie holds a BS in Zoology and an MS in Entomology from UC Davis. She worked for over 40 years as a research scientist, mostly in biochemistry. She has authored or co-authored 28 scientific papers and two book chapters. She joined the Master Gardeners in 2005 and gladly became the group’s resident entomologist. She has given public workshops and presentations for many years, mostly on entomology-related subjects.
 
Kate Brennan became a Master Gardener in 2013 and began rearing Monarch caterpillars after attending a workshop on Monarchs and Milkweed. She is also a member of CNPS and Sierra Foothills Audubon Society.
 
For more information, contact nativeplanthelp@redbud-cnps.org.
 
 

 
Birds and Their Habitats of the Western Sierra
Guest Speaker: Ted Beedy
 
 
 
 
Wednesday, June 27th
7:00 to 9:00 p.m.
 
Auburn Library
350 Nevada Street, Auburn, CA 95603
 
 
 
Ted Beedy will take us on a virtual journey across the Sierra from the oak savanna in the west, up through conifer forests, into the majestic alpine regions. We'll see and hear the stunning diversity of birds that make the Sierra their home. We'll learn how they use the varied habitats, which species are in decline, and which are expanding and increasing.
 
 
Ted recently co-authored Birds of the Sierra Nevada: Their Natural History, Status, and Distribution.
 
 
Ted received his Ph.D. in Zoology from UC Davis. He taught ornithology and other biology classes at UC Davis and California State University, Sacramento before working as an environmental consultant at Jones & Stokes in Sacramento. In 2006, he started his own firm, Beedy Environmental Consulting, in Nevada City.




Plants, Pollen, Pollinators, and Climate Change
Guest Speaker: Randy Oliver
 

 
When: Wednesday, April 11
7:00 to 9:00 p.m.
 
Where: Madelyn Helling Library
980 Helling Way, Nevada City 95959
 
Randy Oliver has kept bees for over 50 years. He will share with us insights gained through his acute awareness of how bees and flowering plants interact.
 
 
 
The flowers and flowering time of most plants are the result of the coevolution of each species of plant with its pollinators. A honey bee colony is completely dependent on the pollen it collects as its source of protein, lipids, sterols, vitamins and minerals. Randy will talk about pollen and the coevolution of plants and their bee pollinators; how climate change and elevated CO2 levels are impacting this critical element of ecology; and our changing local ecosystem.
 
 
 
Randy Oliver owns and operates a small commercial beekeeping enterprise near Grass Valley. With an M.S. in Biological Sciences, Randy sees beekeeping through the eyes of a biologist. He closely follows bee research, engages in some himself, and enjoys sharing what he's learned with others, through articles, speaking engagements worldwide, and on his website, www.ScientificBeekeeping.com.
 

 
 
Come to Redbud’s Winter Meet-up!

“Forest Resiliency”
 
A Conversation with Chris Paulus,
CalFire Battalion Chief (Retired)
 
Saturday, March 10 6:30 to 8:00 p.m.
Sierra Vista Community, Center 55 School Street, Colfax
 

 
Do you have questions about how to help your garden, grassland or forest become more resilient in the face of drought, pests, and fire danger? Come learn about how to restore your local native plant ecosystems to enhance their sustainability and adaptation to current climate conditions.
 
We'll discuss:
  • Growing native plants adapted to your local environment
  • Improving your soil by adding organic matter to increase soil vitality and water-retention capacity
  • Thinning trees and shrubs and planting native perennials and annuals to improve forest health and restore wildlife habitat
  • Broadcast burning to return nutrients to the soil, reduce weeds, and encourage fire-adapted native plants
All are welcome! Come help explore solutions and resources.
We’ll provide handouts on:
  • landscaping with native plants,
  • resources for researching native plants, and
  • strategies improving soil and plant health
 
RSVP to: nativeplanthelp@redbud-cnps.org.

Interested in other topics? Should we schedule additional Meet-ups for Spring? Please let us know when you email your RSVP.
 


 
 
Redbud Plant Propagation Group
 
Native Plant Seed Exchange and Seed Propagation Workshop
(date and location to be determined based on interest).
 
 
 
 
Members of the Redbud Propagation Group have been collecting seeds all summer and fall from a wide range of local native plants growing in our gardens. We will bring these seeds to exchange and share tips on growing specific species.

Email nativeplanthelp@redbud-cnps.org to become a member of the Redbud Propagation Group, and to get details and/or register for this event.
 
 
 
 
Note: We also hope to schedule a workshop on propagating native plants from cuttings if there is enough interest (date & location to be determined) -- we will need at least 12 confirmed registrants. There will be a materials fee to cover the cost of rooting hormones, pots, and potting mix. Cuttings from several varieties of local native plants will be available. Let us know if you are interested in participating in this propagation workshop by emailing nativeplanthelp@redbud-cnps.org.
 
 

 
October, 2017 Lecture
 
Tending the WildTM
Ethnobotany in California’s Mixed Conifer Forests
and Oak Woodlands
 
Guest Speaker: Dr. M. Kat Anderson
 
Wednesday, October 25,
7:00 to 8:30 p.m.
 
Sierra Foothills Unitarian Universalist Church
190 Finley St,
Auburn 95603
 
Dr. M. Kat Anderson, author of Tending the Wild: Native American Knowledge and the Management of California's Natural Resources, will talk about the importance of California black oak and associate trees and understory species of the mixed conifer forests to the indigenous people of the Sierra Nevada.
These plants were used for food, clothing, basketry, firewood, medicines, shelter, tools, and household utensils. The audience will learn about the legacy of stewardship from Sierran Tribes over thousands of years, using sustainable practices to increase food production and improve wildlife habitat. For example, Black oaks were managed at the ecosystem level with frequent, low intensity Indian-set fires, in order to open up the forest, promoting widely-spaced, large-canopied, long-lived oaks and conifers. By using fire to open the forest, Sierran Tribes reduced insect pests and pathogens, improved the health of trees and other flora, fostered useful wild legumes, and encouraged edible and medicinal mushrooms. She will explore some of the potential results of indigenous stewardship that may contribute to forest health including enhanced mycorhizzal relationships with oaks and conifers, nutrient cycling, soil fertility, enhanced soil moisture-holding capacity, and biological action in the soil.
 
In explaining how the stewardship of the Sierran tribes helped to shape the oak woodlands and mixed-conifer forests of the Sierra Nevada, Kat will highlight what we can learn from them to mitigate the decline of the forests and woodlands, and how we can work together with Sierran tribes to tend and restore forest health.
Kat Anderson has a Ph.D. in Wildland Resource Science from UC Berkeley and is the author of the book Tending the Wild: Native American Knowledge and the Management of California’s Natural Resources. She is an affiliate of the UC Davis Plant Sciences Department, and recently retired from the US Department of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation Service. Tending the WildTM was recently chosen by the celebrated permaculture designer Ben Falk as one of the most important books to read in order to permanently solve the world-wide problem of food security. Kat has worked with Native Americans for over 25 years, learning how indigenous people judiciously gather and steward native plants and ecosystems in the wild. Her interests are to learn, celebrate, and restore the traditional and indigenous practices around the world that support both sustainable food production and healthy forests, woodlands, grasslands, and riparian ecosystems. These plant use, gathering, and tending practices and their underlying ethical stances towards nature are found in multiple local cultures here and all around the world.iographical or other explanator information. Biographical or other explanator information. Biographical or other explanator information. Biographical or other explanator information. Biographical or other explanator information. Biographical or other explanator information. Biographical or other explanator information. Biographical or other explanator information.
 
 

 
Attracting Pollinators Using California Native Plants
 
Creating Pollinator-Friendly Gardens
Guest Speaker: Nancy Gilbert



Wednesday, September 27
7:00 to 9:00 p.m.

Madelyn Helling Library
980 Helling St.
Nevada City 95959
 
Nancy will explain the dynamic relationships between flowers and their insect and bird pollinators. She will also share strategies for sustaining pollinators, and for creating pollinator-friendly gardens using California Native Plants
 


Nancy is a photographer and native plant specialist. She is a co-author of the 1st and 2nd editions of the Redbud books “Wildflowers of Nevada and Placer Counties” and of the book “Trees and Shrubs of Nevada and Placer Counties.” Nancy serves as the Horticulture Chair for Redbud and often makes presentations on topics related to gardening with California Native plants, as well as their bird and insect pollinators. 
 

 
Mycorrhizal Fungi and How They Feed the Forest
Guest Speaker: Thea Chesney


Wednesday, August 23rd
7:00 to 8:30 p.m.
 
Madelyn Helling Library
980 Helling Way, Nevada City
 
Thea will explain the basics of mycorrhizal fungal-plant relationships, their diversity, and their critical roles in our forest ecosystems.
 
Mycorrhizal fungi entwine themselves around the fine root tips of plants. They exchange water and mineral nutrients, which they are extremely adept at gathering, for sugars produced by the photosynthetic plant. Not only are mycorrhizal partnerships nearly ubiquitous among plants and key to the plants’ survival, they are fascinating and complex in their own right. We are still learning about the many types of these mutualistic symbioses, the sophisticated chemical signaling and other mechanisms involved, and just how they affect the behavior of both plant and fungal partners.
 
Thea Chesney is a lifelong Placer County resident and naturalist. Since early childhood, she has had an interest in mushrooms, plants, and the rest of the natural world. She holds a B.S. in forestry from UC Berkeley, with an emphasis on botany and natural sciences. Her classes in forest pathology and mushroom identification led to a passion for taxonomy and a love of teaching. As a student, she worked in the Bruns mycology lab, and has since returned there to assist in teaching the mushroom identification course that helped set her on her current path.
 
Thea worked on a mushroom survey crew for the U.S. Forest Service around Mt. Shasta for several seasons, becoming intimately familiar with the fungal inhabitants and ecology of the area. Since then, she has continued as a seasonal botanist with the Forest Service on a long-term statewide meadow monitoring project. Though she now spends her summer days identifying sedges and other wetland plants, she still looks for mushrooms at every opportunity. She has a special interest in fungi of the Sierra Nevada and other California mountains and is currently working on a field guide to mushrooms of these understudied regions. In the winter, she travels to California mushroom events and teaches occasional local mushroom classes.
 
 

 
Plants of the Lewis and Clark Expedition
Guest Speaker: Bob Case


Wednesday, June 28
7:00 to 8:30 p.m.

Auburn/Placer County Library
Beecher Room
350 Nevada Street, Auburn CA 95603
 
When Thomas Jefferson, in a visionary decision, purchased the Missouri watershed in 1803, he chose Meriwether Lewis and William Clark to lead the expedition. Over their journey of three years and 8,000 miles, they made notes, illustrations, and collections of plants, as well as other observations including geology and wildlife.
 
Today, the legacy of that journey includes 176 plant species new to science, many native to California. Bob Case will share with us this rich botanical treasure trove in photos and stories that make this “Greatest American Adventure” come alive.
 
Bob will also participate in two Redbud field trips that will include species discovered by Lewis and Clark. On Wednesday, June 28, we will visit Sagehen Creek off Hwy 89, North of Truckee, and on Thursday, June 29, we will explore a portion of Page Meadows near Tahoe City. Our CNPS Redbud website and our Facebook Events page will soon have info on these special outings.
 
 

 
April, 2017 Lecture
 
The Secrets of Ceanothus!
Guest Speaker: Photographer and Botanist Jeff Bisbee
 
Wednesday, April 26th
7:00 p.m.

Madelyn Helling Library
980 Helling Way, Nevada City 95959
 
Does the old-fashioned nickname “California lilac” do a ceanothus justice? Jeff Bisbee will explore the unique and fascinating world of ceanothus. Over 50 species of Ceanothus are native to California’s foothills, forests, and coasts, and a number are key features of urban and suburban landscapes. Ranging from ground-hugging mats to small trees, Ceanothus are characterized by frothy flower displays in shades of blue, white, and lavender. Learn about their widely-varied sizes and shapes, how to easily grow them from seed, and, of course, their diverse beauty.
 
Jeff, a freelance nature photographer and botanist whose work has been featured in numerous publications, will concentrate on local species. He’ll also share noteworthy examples from other parts of California.
 

Come to Redbud’s Spring Meet-up!
 
Native Plant Communities
Celebrating California Native Plant Week
 
Saturday, April 15
1:30 to 3:30 p.m.
 
Madelyn Helling Library
980 Helling Way, Nevada City
 
All are welcome, whatever your level of experience. Bring your questions and observations, and explore solutions and suggestions with Redbud CNPS experienced gardeners and fellow members. We’ll provide handouts, free seeds, and light refreshments.
 
 
Interested in other topics? Should we schedule additional Meet-ups for Spring? Please let us know when you email your RSVP.
 

 
Come to Redbud’s Winter Meet-up!
 
Your California Native Garden, Part 3
Spring Is Coming!

Wednesday, March 15
1:30 to 3:30 p.m.
 
Madelyn Helling Library
980 Helling Way, Nevada City
 
As winter begins to wane, you’ll want to focus on adding new natives to your garden. We’ll dig into learning planting techniques that increase success, covering topics such as:
  • What are good sources of native plants in spring?
  • How do I know it’s time to plant? What should I plant early…and later?
  • How do I know where to plant different species (e.g., soil, water, and sunlight needs)?
  • How should I prepare the soil?
  • Should I use an organic fertilizer? What about compost?
  • What do I need to know about mycorrhizae?
  • Are there special requirements for transplanting native plants?
  • Are there some that can’t be transplanted?
  • How big a hole should I dig? What shape hole?
  • What should I do about drainage?
  • What irrigation solutions work well?
 

 
The Natural History of Bark Beetles
and the Future of Our Forests
Guest Speaker: Chris Paulus
 
 
Wednesday, February 22nd
7:00 to 9:00 p.m.
 
Auburn/Placer County Library, Beecher Room
350 Nevada Street, Auburn, CA 95603
 
As the saying goes, "It's the small things that make a difference.” In our forests, small things — like beetles, wasps and fungi — are changing our landscape in big ways.
Come to this Passionate About (Native) Plants lecture at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, February 22nd at the Auburn/Placer County Library to learn about the natural history of the bark beetle and the future of our forests — how different our forests of the future will be.
 
Our speaker will be Chris Paulus, retired forester and Cal Fire Battalion Chief. He has worked with local Fire Safe Councils and residents on fire prevention, fire-safe landscape planning, bark-beetle identification and the possibility of mitigation, and options after the beetles.

This is a free public lecture sponsored by the CNPS Redbud Chapter, Nevada and Placer Counties.
 

 
Come to Redbud’s 2nd Winter Meet-up!
 
 
Your California Native Garden, Part 2
Getting Ready for Spring!
Wednesday, February 15
1:30 to 3:30 p.m.
 
Madelyn Helling Library
980 Helling Way, Nevada City
 
At our second Winter Meet-up, we’ll focus on preparing for successful spring growth of the natives you have, and getting ready to plant those you want to add to your garden. We’ll cover topics such as …
 
  • Deciding which natives to plant and where to put them (Come to our 3rd Meet-up on March 15th to talk about when & how to plant)
  • When and how to prune California natives? which ones need or like pruning and which don’t?
  • When should California natives be mulched to keep them healthy and conserve water? What type and how much mulch?
  • How to provide habitat for wildlife in winter (while protecting vulnerable native plants from hungry deer, rabbits, and other critters)?
  • What are natural ways to control weeds (without herbicides)?
  • How to protect against bark beetles, and what to do if the worst happens?
  • How to mitigate negative impacts of neighbors’ properties and enhance the positive, such as impacts on your view, sunlight and drainage, pests and invasive plants, and fire safety.
 
All are welcome, whatever your level of experience. Bring your questions and observations, and explore solutions and suggestions with Redbud CNPS experienced gardeners and fellow members. We’ll provide handouts, free seeds, and light refreshments.
 
Interested in other topics? Should we schedule additional Meet-ups for Spring? Please let us know when you email your RSVP to president@redbud-cnps.org.
 

   
January 21st 2017: First Redbud Meet-up
 
 
Your Native California Garden in Winter,
Part I
Getting Ready for Spring!
Wednesday, February 15
1:30 to 3:30 p.m.
 
Madelyn Helling Library
980 Helling Way, Nevada City
 
Right now, you may not see anything happening in your native garden. But where you can't see, underground, native plants are already actively growing and getting ready for spring.
 
On Saturday, January 21, we'll gather from 1:30 to 3:30 at the Madelyn Helling Library in Nevada City to talk about how you can make the most of the winter months in your garden.
 
Depending on the group's interests, we'll talk about:
  • designing and planning your garden
  • choosing, planting, and growing plants
  • winter care for your garden
  • trouble-shooting special problems, and more
 
All are welcome, whatever your level of experience. Bring your questions and observations, and explore solutions and suggestions with Redbud CNPS experts and fellow members. We'll provide handouts, free seeds, and light refreshments.
Interested in other topics? Should we schedule additional Meet-ups for Spring? Please let us know when you email your RSVP to president@redbud-cnps.org.