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Spring 2007 Newsletter
Vol 16, No. 2, April 2007

Special Evening Program & Field Trip

Vernal Pools
by Prof. Joe Medeiros
Lecture and Slide Show
Friday, April 13 • 7:30–9:00 PM
Sierra College, Sewell Hall • 5000 Rocklin Road
Field Trip
Saturday, April 14 • 9:00 AM
Sierra College, Sewell Hall parking lot
No charge, donation accepted both days

Vernal pools are miniature ecosystems: A special type of wetlands occurring in only a few places in the world. Vernal pools are natural, shallow depressions underlain by an impermeable layer that fill with water for variable periods from winter to spring and are typically dry for most of summer and fall. A diverse array of plants and animals, adapted to a waterlogged spring followed by a parched summer, have evolved to thrive under these conditions. Because of the extreme environment there are relatively few introduced species that can compete with the natives. In addition to providing habitat for the resident species, vernal pools provide resting sites for migrating birds and foraging grounds for Bald and Golden Eagles.

In the spring of 1868, naturalist John Muir said about the staggering numbers of wildflowers that once carpeted the great plain of the Central Valley, “Sauntering in any direction, myfeet would press about a hundred flowers with every step...as if I was wading in liquid gold.” Golden yellow wildflowers like California Goldfields, Tidy Tips, Blennosperma, or the azure and violet-blues of downingias, pale amethyst blooms of Vernal Pool Brodiaea, and monkeyflowers in an array of pinks and yellows. Seas of pearl-white meadow foams, navarretias, and the silvery green foliage of Coyote Thistle are also typical of the vernally wet habitats of vernal pools.

Prof. Joe Medeiros writes, “In spite of what we now know, California’s vernal pools continue to vanish at an alarming rate—all due to Man’s relentless activities. These unique microecosystems, every bit as important as the Galapagos Islands themselves, are being plowed under and buried by concrete, asphalt, and lawns. Millions of years of evolutionary evidence, along with countless unlocked secrets of survival, are lost forever. These tiny, ephemeral expressions of life’s ecstasy are Placer County’s own Giant Sequoias, their Bristlecone Pines, and their coral reefs. That we don’t aggressively protect them is a mystery to me.”

Field Trip

We will visit the Hofman Ranch, a 420-acre working cattle ranch with vernal pools, and possibly the Swainson’s Grassland Preserve, 469 acres of vernal pool grasslands and grazing land, in the Coon Creek watershed near Lincoln, which are being preserved as part of Placer Land Trust’s West Placer Habitat Protection Program.

Plan on a half day trip, walking approximately one mile, to explore this critical vernal pool habitat in western Placer County. Bring a hand lens, field guide, water, lunch, sun protection, and wear sturdy shoes or boots.

Contacts for this dual chapter program: Joan Jernegan, CNPS Redbud, (916) 874-5619 (w) or Jernegan95602@wildblue.net or Richard Rivas, CNPS Sacramento, (916) 714-1104 x 111 (w) or (916) 799-7659 (c) or Richard.Rivas@ca.usda.gov.

Upcoming Chapter Meetings

Wolf Creek Restoration
by Rick Sanger
Wednesday, May 23 • 7:30 PM
Nevada County Library Community Room
Why care about creeks? How do creeks affect our communities? How is it possible to restore neglected creeks? Rick Sanger, president of Wolf Creek Community Alliance will answer these questions and more by highlighting successful creek restoration projects, particularly the restoration of San Luis Obispo Creek, once narrow, hidden away and full of trash, and now at the center of a vibrant downtown.

But can this happen in Grass Valley? Rick and other WCCA colleagues will review plans for therestoration of Wolf Creek, a long-term process that will eventually open up trails, free-up water flow, enhance wildlife, and provide attractive and healthy streamside vegetation. To make the project feasible, volunteers will restore the creek one section at a time, joining forces with environmental groups such as CNPS for clean-up, trail creation, and removal of invasive species, followed by the cultivation of native shrubs, trees, grasses, and flowering plants.

In addition to his work with WCCA, Rick is the founder of Mountain Path Press in Grass Valley and the author of three children’s books. Beyond creeks and publishing, he’s drawn to the wilderness and serves as a seasonal backcountry ranger in Kings Canyon National Park.

Directions: The library is located at 980 Helling Way, Nevada City. At the intersection of Hwy 49 and 20 in Nevada City, turn west toward Downieville on Hwy 49. At 0.5 mile, turn right at the Nevada County Government Center and follow signs to the library.

All Things Wild
by Genelle Treaster
Wednesday, July 25 • 7:30 PM
The Rose Room, Auburn Civic Center

Look through a long-range lens and then zoom back home, guided by Genelle Treaster from All Things Wild nursery. Genelle will begin her presentation with an overview of regional ecosystems and wildlife habitats, placing strong emphasis on ecological conservation. Following this background, she will pull in closer, talking about gardening for wildlife using native plants, showing how each of us as individuals can affect the overall picture.

Genelle has served as a landscape and wildlife consultant for years. She opened All Things Wild, a nursery specializing in California native plants, in March 2006, hoping to provide environmentally
conscious people with a resource for habitat knowledge and native species. All Things Wild is located in Wilton, in the beautiful Cosumnes River Basin, an unspoiled area rich in bird life, but currently threatened by suburban sprawl spilling down from Elk Grove.

Genelle will be speaking to Redbud at an opportune time, hopefully serving as a catalyst as we prepare to open a nursery of our own and as many of us are eager to address conservation issues in the foothills.

Directions: The Rose Room is located at 1225 Lincoln Way. From Highway 49 in Auburn, just after 49 passes under I-80, there is a T intersection. Continue straight ahead at the intersection to the Auburn Civic Center. The building looks like an old school (which it is). Go to the large parking lot behind the building and look for the Rose Room sign.

Name That Wildflower!
Wildflower Identification Workshop
Linnea Hanson & Jenny Marr
Saturday, April 21, 2007, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Home of Sandy Kewman
Woolman Lane, Nevada City

Immerse yourself in wildflowers for a day!  We will start with a classroom session in the morning, studying wildflower anatomy and reviewing the characteristics of major plant families in the Sierra Nevada foothills.  In the afternoon, we will have an extended field session, exploring the grounds of the 230-acre Sierra Friends Center and identifying wildflowers in bloom --- putting our newly-found or our newly-refreshed knowledge to work

Participants will receive a copy of Peterson’s Field Guide to Pacific States Wildflowers, along with a hand lens and an illustrated booklet of plant families.  There will be a workshop fee of $35 to cover all costs.  Bring a bag lunch to fuel yourself at mid-day.  In the evening, as an option for those who want more “plant talk,” we will have a potluck supper and a program of floral slides.

This is a return engagement for Linnea Hanson and Jenny Marr, both residents of Chico, who led a wildly successful weekend workshop at the Sierra Friends Center in April 2006.  Linnea is a botanist with Plumas National Forest in Oroville, working with rare plants and unique plant communities, and Jenny is a botanist and environmental scientist with the habitat conservation division of the California Department of Fish and Game.  Both Linnea and Jenny are active in the Mount Lassen chapter of the Plant Society and are offering this workshop specifically to the Redbud chapter.

Meals: A light breakfast of coffee, tea, juice, and muffins will be provided. A lunch of quiche and salad will also be provided. Although the class will officially be over by 5:00 PM, several people have expressed a desire to hang out in the evening for a potluck supper, more plant talk and possibly a showing of slides. If you wish to join us, please bring a dish to share.

Registration: This class is limited to 25 people and due to its popularity, we may very well have a waiting list. To find out if there’s still room in the class, contact Julie Becker at 265-8197 or jbecker@infostations.com. If you have already signed up and since discovered you can’t attend, please let Julie know so your name can be removed from the registration list and others can be added. We would prefer not to turn anyone away but, again, space is limited.

Payment: Make checks payable to “CNPSRedbud.” Cost for the whole class is an incredible deal of $15 per person. The best option is to mail your check in early to Julie, 13345 Evergreen Drive, Nevada City 95959. The other option is to pay first thing Saturday morning but please remember, this will be a very busy time as we get settled so it’s better to have“finances” out of the way.

Directions to 12960 Woolman Lane
From Grass Valley:
From traffic light at South Auburn Street and West Main Street, take West Main St., which becomes Rough and Ready Highway (0.3 miles from downtown GV to Rough and Ready Hwy). Go 2.3 miles on Rough and Ready Hwy, turn right onto Bitney Springs Road. Go about 1.5 miles on Bitney Springs Rd. to Empress Road, turn right. Go about 0.25 miles to end of Empress Rd. Turn left on Newtown Road. Go about 0.15 miles, turn left on Jones Bar Road.
From Nevada City:
Take CA Hwy 49 toward Downieville. About 1.7 miles out of Nevada City turn left onto Newtown Road at the Willo Restaurant and Bar. Go about 3 miles, turn right onto Jones Bar Road.
At Jones Bar Road:
Go about 0.7 miles to Woolman Lane where you will see a big brown wooden sign that says Sierra Friends Center. Turn right. Go about 0.25 miles to 12960 Woolman Lane, turn left, and proceed to the right once on the driveway. It is a shared driveway. You have arrived! If you need further clarification or you get lost,
call Sandy Kewman at 272-3736.
Thank you, Sandy, for the use of your house and your hospitality!


Mountain Dogwoods
by Roger McGehee

One of the reasons that I purchased the property that I did was because a Mountain Dogwood was growing on it! It was only about 10 feet tall, but was a native and was blooming beautifully. That was five years ago. Now it is about 15 feet tall, and every year it blooms more prolifically than the past. Every spring I wait for the buds to begin to swell so that I can enjoy the flowers for several weeks. And in the fall I enjoy the red berries and red leaves while waiting for the new buds to form so that I know that it will bloom again the next year.

I wanted to plant more Mountain Dogwood trees, but could not find them in local nurseries. There were many hybrids available, but I wanted true natives. This winter, our Horticulture Committee was able to find and purchase an abundant supply of small native Mountain Dogwood trees! Although they are only a few inches tall, planting this tree is most successful when the trees are small. Mountain Dogwoods can adjust to a variety of sites and soils. Mine is in full sun, facing south, is growing in clay soil, and does quite fine. I suspect that it has tapped into some moisture, as Mountain Dogwoods prefer some moisture during the summer. These trees also grow well in partial shade. I encourage you to take advantage of these trees at our spring sale!

We now have our own Internet domain!

www.redbud-cnps.org

In order to have a Web address that is easier to remember and use and to have a permanent Web address, we have purchased our own domain name: http://www.redbud-cnps.org. There are also plans afoot to make our Web site more “user friendly” and an integral part of our publicity and outreach programs.

Please update your bookmark for the chapter.

If you have any comments about or experience any problems with the Web site, please contact Bill Wilson at wilsonb@mjc.edu.

Wildflower Seeds

The following seeds will be available for purchase at our plant sale:
Native to the Nevada–Placer County area:
Fivespot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nemophila maculata
Baby Blue-eyes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nemophila menziesii
Chinese Houses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Collinsia heterophylla
Sky Lupine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Lupinus nanus
Arroyo Lupine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lupinus succulentus
Tufted Poppy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Eschscholzia caespitosa
Birds-eye Gilia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gilia tricolor
Native elsewhere in California:
California Blue Bell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Phacelia campanularia
Whitewhorl Lupine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Lupinus desiflorus var. lacteus
Blazing Star . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mentzelia lindleyi
Scarlet Flax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Linum grandiflorium var. rubrum
Grand Linanthus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Linanthus grandiflorus

Thank you, Suzanne!
Thank you to Suzanne Olive for the use of her artwork for our plant sale flyer. Suzanne is a botanist, artist, and longtime CNPS member. Her botanical graphite pencil drawings reveal her deep appreciation of our Sierra environment and have been included in several national exhibits.

Redbud’s Wildflower Book: Status Report

Since our last newsletter, our upcoming book, Wildflowers of Nevada and Placer Counties, California, has undergone both an internal and external review process. The Editorial Committee has met to discuss each suggestion generated from this review process, and final changes have been made to the book. The Editorial Committee, composed of Chet Blackburn, Julie Carville, Karen Callahan, Richard Hanes, Cindy Rubin, Roger McGehee, and Bill Wilson, is presently making arrangements to have the book published. We are hoping that the book will be available by June.

Spring Plant Sale and Wildflower Show
Saturday, April 28, 2007,
9:30 AM to 1:30 PM
Sierra College, Rocklin

 

Featuring:
• Wildflower show—spectacular native plants in bloom
• Wildflower walk with botany instructor Shawna Martinez, 11:00 AM
• Native plant gardening advice: bring your questions & talk to experts
• California native trees, shrubs, perennials, and seeds
• Books, posters, and note cards of native plants
• Beautiful color botanical image T-shirts and sweat shirts by Delo Rio
• Great Mother’s Day gifts
Sponsored by the
Sierra College Natural History Museum and by and a benefit for the Redbud Chapter, California Native Plant Society Nevada & Placer Counties
To get there: Take the Rocklin Road exit off I-80 to the west entrance of Sierra College. Go to parking lot S and building S (on left). Follow the signs.

Chapter Field Trips:

Late Spring and Summer 2007

All field trips are open to the public and free of charge. CNPS insurance rules prevent us from assigning car pools, but we do suggest ride sharing. Parking space at most trailheads is limited. Bring water, lunch, hand lens, and sun protection or raingear, as needed. No dogs are allowed on any of our field trips.

Unless stated otherwise, our trips are easy, as we travel very slowly so as to view, identify, and talk about each plant. The Rood Center parking lot meeting place is in front of the main building (not at the library).

For more info: Roger at 530-265-4173 or rogm@sbcglobal.net. If rain is predicted, at 7:00 AM (on the day of the trip) a recording will be placed on his answering machine stating whether or not the field trip will take place.

Spenceville Wildlife Area Hike
Wednesday, April 11 • 8:30 AM
Rood Center parking lot; back to our cars in Spenceville by approximately 3 PM Leisurely hike, about 4 miles roundtrip
Leader: Julie Carville
Our destination is the lovely Fairy Falls. We’ll cover basic botany, Nisenan plant uses, pollination processes, and fun stories about the plants. Children 9 years and older welcome. A proposed, sprawling subdivision of over 5,000 homes in the Spenceville area is almost finished moving through the Yuba County Planning Process. This proposal, which would direct over 7,000 vehicles a day through the wildlife area, has been appealed to the Yuba County Board of Supervisors. The Board will hear the appeal at 6:00 PM on Tuesday, May 15th in Marysville. Info: yubahighlands.org or (530) 265-2666.

Contact: Julie at mtngypsy1@sbcglobal.net. If weather is questionable on that day, call 530- 265-4741 after 7:00 AM to get recorded message to see if hike is still a go.

Osceola Ridge/Deadman’s Flat
Wednesday, May 2 • 9:00 AM to 1:00 PM
Safeway parking lot in Grass Valley
Easy walk
Leaders: Julie Carville, Karen Callahan, Roger McGehee

This area is home for rare species, sensitive species, and species of local concern, as well as the great variety of other plants and animals. For detailed information about this area and why it is worth preserving, please see our Winter 2007 newsletter, “Deadman’s Flat as Area of Critical Environmental Concern,” by Karen Callahan. To see for yourself why this area is special, please join us on a walk through this interesting area.

Rock Creek/Skillman
Monday, July 2 • 9:00 AM to 1:00 PM
Rood Center parking lot (not at the library)
Easy walk on wide, gentle, smooth trails
Leaders: Julie Carville, Karen Callahan, Roger McGehee

Rock Creek and Skillman Flat are shady, cool, moist areas known for their wildflowers. Both have all-year creeks lined with riparian vegetation, and several species of orchids grow on these two sites.

Where the Wild Flowers Are
Sunday, July 15 • 9:00 AM to 4:00 PM
Rood Center parking lot (not at the library)
Moderate walk
Leaders: Roger McGehee and others

It is hard to know where the wildflowers will be blooming in mid-July, so the leaders will scout out the best location and take you there. This trip will be at a high altitude and may involve more walking than the others. Please be prepared physically and bring adequate water, food, and clothing, including something warm and raingear.

Key Out Trees!
Sunday, August 12 • 9:00 AM to 4:00 PM
Rood Center parking lot (not at the library)
Easy walks
Leaders: Roger McGehee and others

Bring a copy of Pacific Coast Tree Finder by Tom Watts. (A few copies will be available for loan or for purchase.) We will work our way up the Sierra Nevada by way of Highways 20 and 80, stopping in a few locations to identify our trees. Hopefully, by the time we finish, you will not only know several species of trees by name, but will also be able to key out trees that you don’t know by using the book.

 

Activities sponsored by other groups:

Nevada County Land Trust

Wildflower Walk in Hells Half Acre
Saturday, May 12 • 9:00 AM to 12:00 noon
Cost: $12 Members, $17 Nonmembers
Easy walk
Leader: Karen Callahan

Here is an opportunity to give Mom some very special flowers she’ll never forget this Mother’s Day. Join our tour of a rare habitat in the Grass Valley area where vernal pools on volcanic soils provide a striking display of tiny spring wildflowers. Our own nature photographer Karen Callahan will guide you through this area and help you to examine an amazing diversity of plant life. There will even be a little treat awaiting you to mark the occasion. What a great way to say, “I love you” on Mother’s Day! Information and location: Susan at 272-5994.

Project Budburst

Phenology is the timing of seasonal events such as germination and flowering time in the spring. The U.S. National Phenology Network (NPN) was created in 2006 to facilitate the collection and sharing of phenological data. Project Budburst is an annual campaign designed for the public; it’s the collective effort of scientists and educators interested encouraging citizen scientists to record flowering times in nearby natural areas. Go to the Project Budburst Web site (www.budburst.org) to subscribe (it’s free); complete directions at the Participate! link.

Sierra Foothills Audubon Society

Natural History of the Sierra Nevada
Lecture by John Muir Laws
Thursday, June 14 • 7:30 PM

Techniques for Sketching Birds in the Field
Field Trip by John Muir Laws
Friday, June 15• 9:00 AM
Nevada County Library Community Room

John Muir Laws will present an illustrated evening lecture about the natural history of the Sierra Nevada. He will share the process he used to create his most recent book, The Laws Guide to the Sierra Nevada, an illustrated field guide to more than 1,700 species of plants and animals beautifully illustrated with 2,710 original watercolor paintings. This comprehensive and easy to use guide allows botanists to identify the insects that come to their flowers, birders to identify the trees in which the birds perch, or hikers to identify the stars overhead at night. The morning field trip will demonstrate techniques for sketching birds in the field.

Naturalist, educator, and artist John Muir Laws has worked as an environmental educator for over 25 years in California, Wyoming, and Alaska. He teaches classes on natural history, conservation biology, scientific illustration, and field sketching. He is trained as a wildlife biologist and is an associate of the California Academy of Sciences. He is currently coordinating efforts to create a curriculum to tie the field guide to the State of California education standards and secure funding to donate sets of field guides to every elementary and high school in the Sierra Nevada and teaching field sketching and natural history classes throughout the state.

Friends of the Biological Sciences Herbarium, CSU Chico

The spring and summer workshop list is now available. For details about the workshops and registration please go to www.csuchico.edu/biol/
Herb/Events.html.
April 21 • Botanical Illustration
April 28 • Introduction to Wetland Delineation, Part 2

Message from Our New President

by Frances Jorgensen
The board retreat was attended by 11 enthusiastic members on February 17th. Thank you Gayle Carlsmith for hosting us, and especially the lunchtime entertainment by the neighborhood deer population. Thanks to Eric Jorgensen for lending his excellent facilitation skills and Warren and Ingrid Knox for recording the day’s events.

A major concern was finding ways to get more people involved. We always dream bigger than we can manage all at once. Many new ideas were presented:
• Propagating plants for different restoration projects and to sell at our plant sales
• A native plant demonstration garden
• Tour of local native gardens
• Publicity and distribution of the native plant book to be released very soon
• A workshop on conservation issues
• New brochures to help educate the public on of native plants

As the new president of the Redbud Chapter, I will be looking for ways to accomplish as many of these ideas as possible. If you would like to put your time to good use by getting involved with any of these projects, please let me know. Even a small amount of time can make a difference. We all enjoy sharing our knowledge and expertise while working together to preserve our favorite native plants. What better way to learn about our native landscapes?

The level of expertise and commitment of the volunteer members is impressive and I feel honored to work with such dedicated people. I look forward to the coming year and if you have been thinking of getting more involved, the time has never been better than right now.

New Board Member!!
Brad Carter is our newest board member. He has agreed to be horticulture co-chair, and he and Linda Carlson will begin looking into the feasibility of a demonstration garden. If you would like to join this committee, please contact Brad at 530-271-5790 or bradcarter@aol.com.


2007–08 Board of Directors

Redbud Chapter • California Native Plant Society
Officers
President . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Frances Jorgensen
fjorgen@sbcglobal.net (530) 265-4838
Vice President . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Open
Treasurer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gayle Carlsmith
gayle@gdetails.net (530) 637-1010
Secretary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Open
Newsletter Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Open
Interim Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Roger McGehee
rogm@sbcglobal.net                                    (530) 265-4173
Standing Committee Chairs
Membership Co-Chairs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . Joan Jernegan
Jernegan95602@wildblue.net                   (530) 269-0203
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Open
Program Chair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Julie Becker
jbecker@infostations.com                          (530) 265-8197
Field Trip Chair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Roger McGehee
rogm@sbcglobal.net                                   (530) 265-4173
Events Co-Chairs
Spring Plant Sale Chair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Open
Fall Plant Sale Chair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cyndi Brinkhurst
jcbrink@earthlink.net                                 (530) 274-1924
Publicity Co-Chairs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Don Harkin
(530) 265-4048
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Barbara Roemer
roemiller@infostations.com                     (530) 265-6784
Education Co-Chairs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nancy & Ames Gilbert
nancyames@accessbee.com                (530) 272-4775
Conservation Chair(s) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Open
Plant Science Co-Chairs
Rare Plant Specialist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . Karen Callahan
penstemon@nccn.net                              (530) 272-5532
Invasive Plant Specialist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . Open
Horticulture Co-Chairs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Linda Nowak-Carlson
Lnowakcarlson@yahoo.com                  (530) 478-9387
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Brad Carter
bradcarter@aol.com                                (530) 271-5790
Publications (Books & Posters) Chair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Julie Carville
mtngypsy1@sbcglobal.net                      (530) 265-4741
Nonvoting Committee Chairs & Positions
Chapter Council Delegate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Open
Newsletter Production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cindy Rubin
crubin@nccn.net                                      (530) 273-1816
Mailing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Open
Web Site Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bill Wilson
wilsonb@mjc.edu                                    (530) 265-8040
Hospitality Chair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cyndi Brinkhurst
Wildflower Seed Sales . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . .H. Martin Pancoast
(530) 878-7412
Wildflower Book Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chet Blackburn
chetblackburn@yahoo.com                   (530) 885-0201 (H/F)
Book Marketing Coordinator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Undecided
Restoration Chair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jon Shilling
ourgalsal@prodigy.net                            (530) 272-3861
Past President . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Roger McGehee
rogm@sbcglobal.net                                (530) 265-4173

Volunteer Opportunities

Learn to understand California’s unique flora and help to preserve this rich heritage for future generations. Volunteer your time and talents!
One-Day Opportunities
Spring Plant Sale . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . pg 5, 8
Two-Year Opportunities—Board of Directors
For any position listed as Open, contact Frances Jorgensen or the co-chair, if there is one.

Committee & Project Opportunities
Every “Chair” on the Board has a committee of volunteers to assist them with the projects and activities of that committee. There is a wide variety of interesting things to do, and all of our committees need more members. For more information about the activities and projects of a particular committee or to volunteer, contact the chair for that committee.

Descriptions for each Board position are available on the Chapter Web site along with the Chapter Bylaws.

Attention Members in Placer County

The Redbud Chapter would like to strengthen the participation by members in the Placer County area. In order to do this, we are planning more programs and field trips in the area. However, we need the help of our members who live locally. The plant sale coming up on April 28th is a good place to start. All volunteer offers are appreciated. Please call Frances Jorgensen at 265-4838 or e-mail her at fjorgen@sbcglobal.net if you’d like to volunteer—even small jobs are needed and appreciated.


Last updated
August 25, 2007