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The plants pictured below will be available at the Plant Sale
on May 7 at Sierra College.

Canyon Dudelya
Dudelya cymosa
with Pipevine Swallowtail
by Karen Callahan

Sierra Leopard Lily
Lilium paradalinum
by Karen Callahan


California Fuchsia
Epilobium canun
by Karen Callahan

Spring 2005 Newsletter
Vol 14, No.2. Apr. 2005


The March 23, 2005 Meeting


    It was a dark and stormy night…but sixteen dedicated Redbud members traveled through hail and rain to attend the March 23 meeting. First, we voted to approve the revised Chapter Bylaws as published in the last newsletter. Then Chapter President Chet Blackburn described the duties of the many open board positions and how we can work together to keep Redbud an active voice for native plants.
   By their actions, the members (and a few guests) who came out on March 23 definitely said, “We want Redbud Chapter to continue working for the preservation of our native plants and their habitats in Nevada and Placer Counties.”
    A list of the new volunteers and your 2005- 2006 Board is on page 2. There are, though, still plenty of opportunities to assist on the various committees to be a part of that “active voice for native plants.” Please contact the board members to offer your help with committees or activities.

Going Native with Garden Plants

by Bobbi Navickis Wilkes
    The use of native plants in garden design is a trend that is drawing increasing attention because it makes so much sense. Native plants offer the advantage of being “made for the place.” They have evolved to handle the vagaries of the area’s soil and weather, are in harmony with the surrounding landscape, and are not wasteful of resources. And, of course, California native plants are simply beautiful and offer any inquiring gardener abundant and inspired choices. Not the least consideration is that since native plants are often hard to find at nurseries, a garden with native plants is distinctive and has bragging rights.
    Most of us were drawn to the Sierra Nevada foothills by their beauty, a great part of which is the outstanding and unique plant community. Native plants can be used to design small-scale models of these larger natural areas, such as a special place that you have seen and loved on a hike or a drive. They can also enhance the motif of the native plants already growing naturally in your yard, ranch or neighborhood. They can be used to recreate rock gardens or shaded retreats.
    Nevada County has a Mediterranean climate with mild, wet winters and hot, dry summers with little or no rain. The long, hot summers pose the greatest challenge to most plants when water becomes a precious commodity. Most California native plants are water-wise, having adapted strategies to make it through the dry season. Once established, which usually takes two to three years, native perennials, shrubs and trees can weather the summer with little or no water. Native plants also blend well with other popular water-wise Mediterranean climate plants, such as lavender, rosemary and thyme. Two other important advantages are that native plants need little or no fertilizers or pesticides. Native plants can also attract glorious birds, butterflies and beneficial insects to your garden.
    Native plants come in all forms: trees, shrubs, vines, perennials, annuals, bulbs, grasses, ground covers, and wildflowers. In choosing native plants, the same rules apply as with selecting any plant. A plant’s needs should be matched to the site’s characteristics, such as sun or shade, drainage pattern and water availability. Also consider the plant’s color, form, life-span, and seasonable attributes. A good rule of thumb for any garden design is to group together plants with similar water needs. If you see a native plant growing in the wild, take note of its habitat. That will tell you much about the needs and likes of the plant. With the advent of the World Wide Web, detailed information on many of California native plants can be easily found with a simple Google search. A growing number of demonstration gardens are being devoted to native plants, and seeking these out can give you great ideas on how to incorporate native plants into your garden.
    Native animals often like native plants too. So don’t forget to factor in hungry native visitors to your garden such as deer, rabbits, and ground squirrels. There are many beautiful native plants that these critters don’t find palatable, such as those with gray-green foliage and/or distinctive herbal odors.
    I live in a sunny, south-facing spot, and I have made great use of the wide selection of native sages. Most are deer resistant and drought tolerant. A favorite is Cleveland Sage (Salvia clevelandii). Monkeyflowers ( Mimulus ssp .) and Penstemons are other good choices for sunny spots. For shade gardens, Western Spicebush (Calycanthus occidentalis), Snowberry (Symphoricarpos albus) and Dogwoods (Cornus ssp.) are superb shrubs. Creeping sage (Salvia sonomensis) makes a beautiful ground cover. Native sedges work well for pool or pond plantings. Western Redbuds (Cercis occidentalis) provide stunning pink spring flowers. There are a number of wonderful, unique native California oaks from which to choose to complement our foothill landscape.
    The books Growing California Native Plants by Marjorie G. Schmidt, University of California Press, 1980 and Gardening with a Wild Heart by Judith Larner Lowry, University of California Press, 1999 are excellent resources for native plant gardening. The most recent Sunset Western Garden Book also contains very good guidance on native plant gardening.
Finding native plants for sale is often the hardest part of growing them. The Redbud Chapter’s two annual sales are among the best in the state. Now, how lucky is that? What are you waiting for? See you at the Spring Plant Sale Saturday, May 7th.


Confessions from the Side Lines


By Frances Jorgensen
    I have been a member of CNPS for many years and enjoyed the interesting newsletters. The programs always sounded good even though I seldom attended. When a park near my house in the San Francisco Bay Area was threatened by a golf course, the newsletter was my conduit of information even though I seldom joined any of the activities. Ultimately, the local chapter of CNPS was instrumental in saving my beloved park where I had been enjoying the wild flowers even before it was a park. I have also enjoyed the native plant sales where I learned about the plants in my world—how to grow them and use them in landscaping, how to identify them. CNPS has been my connection to the land I love.
    I heard the plea in the Fall newsletter and realized that it must be my turn to step up and do my part to make this organization work. I’m looking forward to working with the other members and getting to know people who are as passionate about wildflowers as I am. And I look forward to learning even more about the native flora.
    If you have been like me, sitting on the sidelines, enjoying the newsletters, the plant sales, and the field trips, maybe it’s your time to step up to the plate and join the rest of us energetic, fun, intelligent, beautiful people while enriching your own life.
    I am currently organizing the plant sale and invite you to help us put on the best ever native plant sale on Saturday, May 7. I look forward to hearing from you soon.
To volunteer for the Spring Plant Sale and Wildflower Show please contact her by email at fjorgen@nccn.net.

Volunteer Positions for Spring Plant Sale 2005
•Phoning volunteers: Help coordinate volunteers with phone calls mostly before the sale.
•Refreshments: Solicit donations and/or purchase refreshments for our volunteers, pick up and deliver them to the sale, set up a refreshment area (for volunteers only).
•Pick up plants on Friday from Chet’s and deliver them on Saturday to Rocklin: Need
4 trucks with covers or vans with someone to drive them, of course.
•Setup: Help set up tables and haul plants. Need strong backs to move the heavy tables.
•Plant booth: Sell plants at our booth, meet the public, talk about native plants, have fun.
•Holding area: Hold plants while customers buy more plants, answer questions, give directions.
•Cashiers: The fun job—collecting money.
•Carriers: Help customers carry plants to cars.
•Break down and put away: Strong backs needed again to put away tables and haul plants left over after the sale. Trucks also needed (especially with covers) to return plants to Nevada City for safe keeping until the next sale.

Thank you to all our participating nurseries and other businesses:
•Abacus, Auburn
•Blue Oak Nursery, Nevada City
•Cornflower Farms, Elk Grove
•Far West Bulb Farm, Grass Valley (sorry, no bulb sales until fall)
•Restoration Resources, Rocklin
•Sierra Valley Farms, Beckwourth
•Sierra View, Loomis
•Sweetwater Nursery, Colfax
•Arts Alive, wearable wildflower art
•Blue Belly Worm Farm, worm compost
Others may be added!


Chapter Meetings and Field Trips


A final schedule for Chapter activities was not available as of press time for the newsletter.

•Check the Redbud web site periodically for updates at www.nccn.net/~cnps.
•Contact Frances Jorgensen to be on the email fjorgen@nccn.net.
•Contact Marie Bain for information about chapter meetings.


Earth Day Clean Up Party at Hells Half Acre
Tuesday, April 19, 9:00–11:30 AM


    The annual wildflowers at HHA such as White Meadowfoam, Butter and Eggs, Cowbag Clover, Blue-Eyed Mary, Ramm’s Madia, Miniature Lupine, and Pansy Monkeyflowers are benefiting from the recent abundant rainfall. It’s one of the best shows in many years! Join us for a morning of work at our favorite
local wildflower field. After the old televisions and mattresses are hauled away out of the bushes, we’ll take some time to botanize and admire the view.
   Important: Bring your work gloves and wear enclosed shoes or boots. There are sharp objects on the ground. The property owners will provide trash bags, a hauling truck, and driver. Questions? Call Karen Callahan at 530-272-5532.

Meeting place: Take Main Street going west from Grass Valley. Just past Lyman Gilmore School, turn left onto Squirrel Creek Road. This road is opposite to the Cemetery and NID Building. Go on Squirrel Creek Road past the Oak Market and Adam Avenue, then look for Gold Drive on your right. Go to the end of this residential street and you will see the turnout area directly ahead.


CNPS Fortieth Anniversary Meeting


    The Sacramento Valley, Mt. Lassen, and Redbud Chapters are co-hosting the June 11–12 CNPS Statewide Chapter Council. The Council will be held at the beautiful 230-acre Sierra Friends Conference Center in Nevada County, formerly the John Woolman School campus. Most of the day on Saturday, June 11, will be a business meeting of Chapter representatives. On Saturday evening a dinner and speaker program is planned. Because this year marks the 40th anniversary of CNPS’ founding there will be displays from thirty chapters all over California highlighting special projects and activities. Due to the terms of the use permit for the Sierra Friends Conference Center, attendance by people who are nonresidents (not spending the night) is not allowed (to minimize traffic in the Center’s neighborhood). If you would like to attend the Council and Saturday evening program, please plan on reserving a campsite or rustic cabin. Contact Michael Logue at 530-273- 3183 or email michael@woolman.org for reservations at SFCC. Prices for accommodations and meals are very reasonable.
    Volunteers from our chapter are needed to help at the conference. The volunteer helpers are not required to spend the night because we are considered temporary “employees.” If you are interested in helping make this a fantastic gettogether, please volunteer for at least six hours on Saturday (AM or PM shift) and/or for Sunday morning. All the details have yet to be worked out. Contact Karen Callahan to volunteer at 530- 272-5532. The off campus field trips during the weekend will be open to all CNPS members.


Scientists generally agree that invasive plants and animals constitute one of the greatest threats to Earth’s natural webs of life, or ecosystems. Invasions are second only to habitat loss as a cause of species endangerment and extinction. In the Untied States, of an estimated total of 150,000 species, 7,000 are aliens. Invasions have tremendous economic impacts as well: It’s estimated that invasive species cost the United States more than $138 billion a year.
—Sylvia Wright. “Threat to Coastal Ecosystems,” UC Davis Magazine, Volume 22, Number 3, Spring 2005.


CNPS Sampling Protocol Workshop


    The Redbud Chapter will host two weekend workshops on Saturday and Sunday, May 21/22 and May 28/29, where participants will learn the CNPS protocols for sampling vegetation and identifying plant communities. The workshop is free to all CNPS members. Nonmembers may join CNPS for $35.00 at the workshop, if they would like to participate. We will meet to car pool at 9:00 AM at the northeast side of the Safeway parking lot in Grass Valley, returning by 4:30 PM. We expect to sample a variety of plant community sites including sites on serpentine and/or gabbrodiorite.
    The CNPS vegetation training will provide you with a brief description of plant communities and methods for documenting them, which can apply to a variety of purposes (e.g., scientific description, mapping, conservation). You will learn how to use the Vegetation Relevé method to document existing and new plant communities and receive a brief overview of the Rapid Assessment protocol. These protocols assist in identifying and representing plant communities at a floristic, fine-scale as listed in the CNPS publication, A Manual of California Vegetation (Sawyer and Keeler-Wolf, 1995). We have been using these methods over the past 9 years to expand the scope of this publication (soon to be republished) and to increase its applicability across the state. More practically, Chapters can use the protocol to observe and defensibly record information on vegetation for conservation and legal purposes, as Chapters focus on priorities such as locating and defining the extent of native and nonnative floras, locally rare native species and communities, and prime native habitats.
    The data we collect on May 21-22 and 28-29 will contribute to a broad scale Sierra Nevada foothills sampling project undertaken by CNPS, through a contract with the Department of Fish and Game. Workshop participants will leave the workshop with sufficient knowledge of the sampling protocol to continue sampling vegetation for the Sierra Nevada foothills project as volunteers if they so choose, provided they, or someone on the team, can identify most plants to the species level.
    Please contact Redbud member Josie Crawford by phone or email for more detailed information and/or if you are interested in attending one or both days: at the CNPS state office (916) 327-8454 or her home (530) 268-1474; email: josie@cnps.org. For information on the protocols and other CNPS workshops visit the CNPS web site at www.cnps.org and look for the links under Programs to Plant Science, then vegetation, then protocol or training. This and other CNPS sampling protocol workshops are funded by a grant from the National Wildlife Foundation.


Activities of Other Organizations


These are activities not sponsored by Redbud Chapter, but of interest to our members. Some of these events charge a participation fee; please see descriptions for details.

Fifteen Years of Native Grassland Restoration in California
April 14–16, Woodland, Yolo County
At this conference organized by the California Native Grassland Association there will be workshops, field trips, and speakers. For complete information call 530-759-8458 or go to www.cnga.org.

Treks Through Time
A series of field trips sponsored by the Nevada County Land Trust. For complete information phone 530-272-5994 or check their web site at www.NevadaCountyLandTrust.org. Wildflower walks include: Julie Carville and Bill Nickerl, Codfish Falls, April 16; Karen Callahan, Hells Half Acre, May 1; Chet Blackburn, Rock Creek Nature Trail, June 4; plus many more great treks.
On May 22 the Second Annual Native American Cultural Day will be held at Burton Park near Nevada City.


Photos Needed for Redbud’s Wildflower Book

Alphabetical order by botanical name, as of November 23, 2004
Redbud Chapter’s book, Wildflowers of Placer and Nevada Counties, is nearing completion. However,
there are about 50 flowers for which we do not yet have photographs (many of these are common
nonnatives.) If you are a flower photographer and have good, identifying photographs of any of the
listed flowers, please contact Chet Blackburn at chetblackburn@yahoo.com or 530-885-0201.
Arabis breweri . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Brewer Rock Cress
Arabis holboellii var. pinetorum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pine Rockcress
Arnica mollis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . Soft Arnica
Capsella bursa-pastoris . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Shepherd’s Purse
Cardamine breweri var. breweri . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . Brewer Bittercress
Carduus pycnocephalus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . Italian Thistle
Castilleja affinis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Common Paintbrush
Centranthus ruber . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . .Red Valerian
Cerastium glomeratum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Mouse Ear Chickweed
Ceratophyllum demersum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . .Hornwort
Cicuta douglasii . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Western Water Hemlock
Cordylanthus tenuis ssp. tenuis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Slender Bird’s Beak
Descurainia pinnata var. halictorum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tansy Mustard
Draba verna . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . Whitlow Grass
Epilobium brachcarpum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . Panicled Willow Herb
Epilobium densiflora . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Denseflower Willow Herb
Epilobium glaberrimum ssp. glaberrimum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Glaucous Willow Herb
Erigeron inornatus var. inornatus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . California Rayless Daisy
Eryngium vaseyi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Coyote Thistle
Floerkea proserpinacoides . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . False Mermaid
Geranium dissectum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cutleaf Geranium
Hirschfeldia incana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Shortpod Mustard
Kelloggia galioides . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kellogia
Kickxia elatine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . Sharp-point Kickxia
Lactuca biennis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tall Blue Lettuce
Lactuca serriola . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . Prickley Lettuce
Lepidium perfoliatum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . Shield Cress
Leucanthemum vulgare . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . .Ox-eye Daisy
Malacothrix floccifera . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . .Woolly Malacothrix
Malva neglecta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . Common Mallow
Melilotus alba . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . White Sweetclover
Melilotus officinalis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . Yellow Sweetclover
Orthocarpus cuspidata ssp. cryptanthus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Shortflower Owl’s Clover
Physalis lancifolia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ground Cherry
Pogogyne serpylloides . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . Thymeleaf Pogogyne
Polygonum lapathifolium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Willow Weed, Pale Smartweed
Polygonum persicaria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lady’s Thumb
Polygonum polygaloides ssp. confertiflorum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Denseflower Knotweed
Raphanus sativus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wild Radish
Rumex crispus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Curly Dock
Ranunculus muricatus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . Prickleseed Buttercup
Sagittaria latifolia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . Broadleaf Arrowhead
Sanguisorba occidentalis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . Western Burnett
Sanicula bipinnata . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . Poison Sanicle
Solanum nigrum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Black Nightshade
Tribulus terrestris . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Puncture Vine
Trifolium dubium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Little Hop Clover
Urtica dioica . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . .Hoary Nettle
Utricularia gibba . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Swollenspur Bladderwort


Book Review

Wildflowers of Table Mountain is an attractive new book by Samantha Hillaire Mackey and Albin Bills with illustrations by Larry Jansen, published by the Herbarium, California State University, Chico. This soft cover guidebook has a complete plant list, drawings and descriptions of selected plants, and information on the geology and natural history of North Table Mountain. North Table Mountain is northeast of Oroville and is famous for its great diversity of spring wildflowers. We plan to have copies at our plant sale book table or you may order from Samantha at hillairesa@butte.edu.



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Last updated
April 25, 2005